Prop Making Master Post: Different Materials and How to Work With Them

cosplaying-on-a-budget:

I’ve had several questions about how to make props lately and I thought it was time for another master link post, so I’ve compiled a list of links to different tutorial explaining how to work with each material. There are several different methods for making props, and each method requires a unique set of skills and a variety of tools. Some methods are also more expensive than others.This is just to sampling what you can do with each method, I recommend doing more extensive research on whatever you end up trying.

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kuekuastu:

How to Make Female Cosplay Armor, Tutorial Part 1

(Source: youtube.com)

katarinacosplay:

This is insanely cool. How to make craft foam look like leather by travelsatnight.

beauty-360:

HOW TO: Applying False Eyelashes
Learning to apply lashes can be a difficult task for beginners, so today I’m going to tell you a few tips on how to apply them quickly and easily.
Don’t get discouraged. It can take many attempts before you’ll be able to put them on successfully. Visit your local beauty store and get a few pairs of the cheap kinds- since these will be just for practice.
Make sure you use a good lash glue. Clear or colored lash glues generally work the best.
Cut your lashes to the right size for your eyes! I cannot stress this enough. Your lashes should never go past the end of your eyelids.
Put mascara on. You want to do this before you apply false lashes so they blend better.
Apply some of the lash glue onto a q-tip, then run your lash over the glue. Sometimes, trying to put glue directly onto the lash can be a bit messy. Wait 10-20 seconds for the glue to get tacky.
Use either your fingers or tweezers to place them as close to your lash line as possible. It’s okay if it’s not exact.
Get a damp q-tip and use it to push your lash into place. Slightly damp q-tips will allow you to get it exactly where you want it without them sticking to you.
Use tweezers to pinch them onto your natural lash line. Be very careful that you don’t accidentally pinch your own lid or rip out an eyelash. I recommend slanted tweezers for this.
Let them dry and adjust to how they feel. False lashes can feel weird the first  time you wear them, so make sure you give yourself time to get used to it.
Practice. You probably wont get it right the first time, but that’s okay. Just be patient and you’ll get the hang of it.
Once you’ve learned how to apply them, I recommend using good quality lashes such as the ones by Ardelle or Andrea. For glue, Duo is always a good brand- though any clear glue will do just fine.
Good luck!

beauty-360:

HOW TO: Applying False Eyelashes

Learning to apply lashes can be a difficult task for beginners, so today I’m going to tell you a few tips on how to apply them quickly and easily.

  1. Don’t get discouraged. It can take many attempts before you’ll be able to put them on successfully. Visit your local beauty store and get a few pairs of the cheap kinds- since these will be just for practice.
  2. Make sure you use a good lash glue. Clear or colored lash glues generally work the best.
  3. Cut your lashes to the right size for your eyes! I cannot stress this enough. Your lashes should never go past the end of your eyelids.
  4. Put mascara on. You want to do this before you apply false lashes so they blend better.
  5. Apply some of the lash glue onto a q-tip, then run your lash over the glue. Sometimes, trying to put glue directly onto the lash can be a bit messy. Wait 10-20 seconds for the glue to get tacky.
  6. Use either your fingers or tweezers to place them as close to your lash line as possible. It’s okay if it’s not exact.
  7. Get a damp q-tip and use it to push your lash into place. Slightly damp q-tips will allow you to get it exactly where you want it without them sticking to you.
  8. Use tweezers to pinch them onto your natural lash line. Be very careful that you don’t accidentally pinch your own lid or rip out an eyelash. I recommend slanted tweezers for this.
  9. Let them dry and adjust to how they feel. False lashes can feel weird the first  time you wear them, so make sure you give yourself time to get used to it.
  10. Practice. You probably wont get it right the first time, but that’s okay. Just be patient and you’ll get the hang of it.

Once you’ve learned how to apply them, I recommend using good quality lashes such as the ones by Ardelle or Andrea. For glue, Duo is always a good brand- though any clear glue will do just fine.

Good luck!

projectcosplay:

These were made with mirror vinyl (bought from a Chinese seller) over craft foam held together with various glues.

This is the process / tutorial used.

Use the following chart when adhering materials so they stick well:

  • Vinyl front to vinyl front: Super Glue / Krazy Glue
  • Foam to vinyl front: Coat the foam in a very thin layer of hot glue, let it dry, then use Super Glue / Krazy Glue
  • Foam to vinyl backing: Contact Cement / Contact Spray
  • Foam to foam: Hot Glue (or your favorite method…this is my preferred)

Others have used contact cement to hold the foam to the vinyl backing but because contact cement smells like death to me, I prefer the contact spray adhesive instead.

Really love using this method as it’s fast, easy, and light. Luckily, my armor did not have any complex curves because if it did, I would have used Worbla instead.

gekroent:

Tipp for working with EVA/rubber foam.
Don’t seal your armor with cheap woodglue that is NOT water resistant. Better spend 2 or 3€ more than end up like this.
I got into a heavy rain with my Ancient Nord Armor (Skyrim) and have to seal everything again and repaint/remake other parts of the armor.
When getting wet all the not-water-resistant wood flue will TURN WHITE AND STICKY. If exposed too long the water will simply wash off the icky glue.
You can wait for it to dry again, if it didn’t get too wet there won’t stay any damage.
But I highly recommend water resistant wood glue.

gekroent:

Tipp for working with EVA/rubber foam.

Don’t seal your armor with cheap woodglue that is NOT water resistant.
Better spend 2 or 3€ more than end up like this.

I got into a heavy rain with my Ancient Nord Armor (Skyrim) and have to seal everything again and repaint/remake other parts of the armor.

When getting wet all the not-water-resistant wood flue will TURN WHITE AND STICKY. If exposed too long the water will simply wash off the icky glue.

You can wait for it to dry again, if it didn’t get too wet there won’t stay any damage.

But I highly recommend water resistant wood glue.

tumblingmagpie:

I’ve put all of the fabric painting tutorials into one big photo post.

Includes silk painting with resist (Elven Banner), free-hand painting on stretch fabrics (Jareth from Labyrinth), fake embroidery with puffy paint (Peter of Narnia), graphite transfer paper with fabric paint pens (Tali from Mass Effect) and regular Tulip fabric paint (TARDIS lab coat).

Maybe this format is better?

I’m Suga today! Come find me at AX

I’m Suga today! Come find me at AX

cyansonata:

Body paint techniques for various skin types with Ben Nye Crème Character Base or Ben Nye Crème Colors. 

  • For oily skin

Apply paint with brush or sponge. Set with Ben Nye neutral (translucent) powder. Spray with Ben Ney Final Seal. Used by spectredeflector.

  • For normal skin

Apply paint with brush or sponge. Set with baby powder. Spray with final seal. Used by captain-mindfang.

  • For dry skin

Dip a brush in baby oil before using it to apply paint. Set with baby powder. Spray with final seal. Used by me.

All can be removed easily and gently with Neutrogena Oil-Free Eye Makeup Remover

Fabric Painting on Costumes: Part Four

tumblingmagpie:

The fourth part: onto Tali from Mass Effect.

1) Using flowing silk paints with resist for an Elven Banner (Part One found here.)

2) Free-hand painting on stretchy fabric for Jareth the Goblin King (Part Two found here.)

3) Puffy paints to simulate embroidery on Peter, High King of Narnia (Part Three found here.)

and 4) Using graphite transfer paper as a stencil for Tali from Mass Effect.

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(Photo by Minty and Minty)

Tali’Zorah vas Normandy, the quarian engineer and squadmate from the video game “Mass Effect”, wears a stretchy bodysuit with painted/printed and textured details.

Using a commercial nylon-spandex bodysuit and a duct-tape body double, I drafted a pattern for the swirly-purple and black-hexagon sections of this costume. Some of the purple fabric is appliqued to the bodysuit (the sashes/bandages), and some are separate accessories (the hood/vest and arm tubes). The black-hexagon fabric is appliqued to the suit.

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I used a midweight nylon-spandex knit fabric for the purple (I bought white and hand-dyed it purple with acid dyes - different topic!) and a very heavy, slightly shinier black nylon-spandex knit for the black (sold as “moleskin” but I find retailers use that term indiscriminately).

So - both the purple and black are thicker knit fabrics and paints are therefore less likely to run on them (no need for a resist). But they are both dark, opaque fabrics so you can’t trace a paper template design beneath them.

I experimented with stencils, but I couldn’t get anything close to an accurate design for either the hexagons or swirls to work.

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It’s not the most elegant solution, but in the end I printed out the designs on construction paper, put some graphite paper between the fabric and the paper template, and transferred the graphite by going over the paper design with ballpoint pens & pressure. Step by step:

1. Make a “tile-able” design.

This means that an image can be placed side by side with itself without visible seams - it flows from one edge to the next. You need this sort of repeatable image for floor tiles, printing fabric, etc. This is a good definition.

I don’t do this often enough to know how to do it without help every time. So I google for tileable image photoshop tutorials. Here are two:

MyJanee.Com

Youtube video by Kelly Yu

As a base, I used the Tali swirl and hexagon patterns kindly made available by shyailu on Spoonflower. Since they are used by Spoonflower in printing, they are theoretically tileable - but not in the form they put on the website, so I needed to do a lot of photoshopping to get them tileable and the right scale and size for my project.

Then I printed a bunch of these on construction paper.

(I decided not to use Spoonflower because for this costume I didn’t like their fabric choices. I like the rich colours, subtle shine and heavy drape of thick nylon-spandex knit. Since I was dyeing the purple myself, I also wanted a nylon blend rather than polyester - but again, different topic!)

2. Transfer the design.

Graphite-based transfer paper is a bit cleaner than old-fashioned carbon paper (though still kinda messy) and is pretty cheap. When you put pressure on the top of this paper, it transfers graphite (in this case blue) to the surface below, so it creates a copy of what you’ve drawn or traced. Examples:

At Jo-Ann’s

General Transfer Paper info on Art-is-fun.com

After securing the fabric, graphite paper and construction paper template with tape, I labouriously traced that swirl design over and over again, moving the paper over carefully each time to match up the design.

image

It was by no means perfect, and during the painting phase I ended up free-handing some of the seam-lines to make the swirls match up more nicely.

Since I needed to put a lot of pressure on the ballpoint pen to get the design to transfer, the paper templates did not last very long, and I had to keep switching out for new ones.

I did the same for the Hexagons, but didn’t take pictures. It was less exciting than the swirls anyway.

3. Paint the design.

After experimenting with both silver Sharpie markers and silver Fabric paint markers (DecoFabric - as always, Dharma Trading has good information about them too), I decided that the silver DecoFabric looked best on the purple, while the silver Sharpie looked best on the black. The fabric paint markers are a bit shinier and more opaque than the sharpie, and the swirls on the purple stand out more than the hexagons on the black.

Graphite can be washed off. But from this point on there is no turning back! I did screw up my first piece of hexagon fabric and had to redo the whole thing.

Here’s a test I did with the final hexagon design and silver Sharpie marker, wondering whether I should fill the hexagons in with silver paint. I decided against that.

image

The Sharpies lasted a bit longer and seemed to cover more smoothly on this black fabric, while the fabric paint markers were just eaten up by my purple fabric. You don’t want to know how many fabric paint markers I went through on this. I don’t want to know. It was dozens. I filled a plastic grocery bag with used-up fabric paint markers. In the end, this was not a cost-effective strategy!

Sharpie marker is quite permanent. The DecoFabric paint markers benefit from some heat-setting, so I brushed the graphite off, ironed the purple fabric and then washed it cold and line-dried it before working with it further.

image

Up close my fabric is obviously hand-drawn and imperfect. If I could do this again, I’d finally get around to learning to screen-print.

Anyway, the technique of graphite paper is pretty cool, and fabric markers are easy to use. But this took me FOREVER* and I used all the fabric paint markers in the city.

*In calmer moments, I will admit that once I began transferring the final design through to the end of painting, it took a full-time week.

Wearing wigs for long/thick/voluminous hair

starexorcist:

Have a lot of hair?

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No problem! you can still wear wigs.

Step 1: part your hair in half

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Step 2: take one half and twist it. I find braids are bulkier than these twists.

image

Step 3: hold that somehow (I usually just stick it in my mouth)

image

Step 4: do the same with the other half (sorry for the blur)

image

Step 5 :Wrap that around the back of your head

image

Steo 6:Do that for both sides

image

Step 7: PIN THAT JUNK DOWN LIKE A BOSS

image

Step 8: Use a mesh wig cap (not the stocking kind)

image

Step 9: PIN IT DOWN MORE. Through wig shifting your hair pins might come loose and there is no such thing as too many hair pins. This will survive wig changes and all.

image

Step 10: TADAA YOU’RE HAIR BEAST HAS BEEN TAMED

image

CHEAP Black to Red DIY Ombre Tights Tutorial In Under 1 Hour!

I needed ombre tights for RWBY’s Ruby Rose and I didn’t wanna go online and buy like a freaking $39 tights… Sooo here’s a tutorial for tights that was under $10 :) And the best thing, besides how cheap it is, is that you can do it in any color you want :D 

Materials:

Procedure:

  1. Try to follow the directions on the RIT dye box as much as possible if you can. First wet your tights with hot water. Keep that to the side for now.
  2. I filled my bucket with hot water up to about where my tights could float freely pretty well. Then I was lazy and didn’t want to figure out how much dye to put in, so I just poured in the whole red packet in LOL. Also keep in mind to put your bucket in the bathtub, cause dye could splash around.***
  3. I put my tights in and stirred that sucker for 10 minutes straight. After 10 minutes were up I rinsed my tights with hot water gradually making it cold water until the water ran mostly clean.
  4. Now for the ombre part. Mark off where you want your ombre to start by tying a knot. 
  5. Clean your bucket and repeat steps 1-2 with your other color.
  6. Dunk your tights in to a little bit under where your knot is. Now this the tricky part to explain. while your hold your tights in one hand keep dunking your tights in and out (pics 3-4) so that the dye doesn’t stay in one place the whole time. With your other hand gently squeeze out the dye from under your knot, so once again the dye doesn’t just settle there. Do this whole process for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes were up rinse like how you did last time.
  7. Let them dry :)

I can’t tell you how this will wash in the washing machine cause I haven’t tried it myself. To be honest I might just hand wash them though to be safe and so the colors don’t get too crazy. 

Note: ***Start with the lighter color, the darker color over the lighter color will make it easier to color as well. If you’re doing something where the hues are similar or going from white to a color, I would suggest you dunk your first color a little above where the second color would go (so you start from step 6 and repeat for second color) 

I hope that was comprehensible :x If not just send an ask and I’ll be glad to help :D 

truebluemeandyou:

DIY Ultimate Know Your Skirts Guide Infographic from Enerie. For more very popular ultimate guides from Enerie go here:

anachronisminaction:

Loki Crafts - part 1

I had originally planned to commission someone to make my Lady Loki Diadem for me, but that unfortunately did not end up working out. I have never made anything quite like this before, so it has been an interesting learning curve for me. Making it myself at least allows me to make the horns and diadem/crown separately. It’s not normal for a Lady Loki coslay, but I want to wear the horns alone later to Labyrinth of Jareth.

The photos above are my progress based off a hodge podge of different tutorials, most of which I found through google, and the gracious advice of master diadem makers Morgan crone: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MorganCroneCreations?ref=pr_faveshops and raven king relics: https://www.etsy.com/shop/RavenKingRelics

1- Millinery Wire and leather base. Copydex glue (a latex based leather glue) and thread. Headband is an adjustable bra strap (Detachable on one side)

2- Using photoshop I printed out various styles of horns in different sizes, eventually picking one I liked to use as a template.

3- I attached more millinery wire to the base, and bent to the shape of the horn template (Slightly smaller) and secured in place with tape.

4- filling the center of the wires, and wrapping the entire form with aluminum foil.

5- Entire form covered in foil.

6- form covered in epoxy clay (White) and left to air dry over night. Unfortunately the clay was a bit heavier than I expected. As they dried they drooped down and a little apart. The rubber band helped  somewhat but I did need to make a few bend to the wire base to re-balance the weight of the horns. * Please continue to the other parts to see the finished result. If I did this again, I would probably use expanding foam or worbla instead of clay because of weight.


Part 2: http://anachronisminaction.tumblr.com/post/88541096299/loki-craftwork-part-2-prior-to-this-project-i-had
Part 3: http://anachronisminaction.tumblr.com/post/88541537204/loki-crafts-part-3-after-the-horns-cured-i-spent
Part 4: http://anachronisminaction.tumblr.com/post/88542363854/loki-crafts-part-4-finishing-torque-using

matrices:

How to make a zip on tail!
A tutorial for skilled tailors. This should be done before you make your tail, so your tail can be made to the size of the zipper. And the zipper slider pinned and oriented to match the body so your tail aligns correct. You can add any other features as you see fit (I.e. belt loops).
Also this should be done before you sew the front half of your body to the back half!
Enjoy! :D

matrices:

How to make a zip on tail!

A tutorial for skilled tailors. This should be done before you make your tail, so your tail can be made to the size of the zipper. And the zipper slider pinned and oriented to match the body so your tail aligns correct. You can add any other features as you see fit (I.e. belt loops).

Also this should be done before you sew the front half of your body to the back half!

Enjoy! :D